10 Awesome Jean Hacks

jean hacks

Did you know you could make your own distressed jeans?

This is just one of the jean hacks I’ll show you in this article.

I’m going to show you 10 of the craziest jean hacks you should know about.

Distressing

Distressing your jeans is the first jean hack I’d like to discuss, and how you can do it yourself.

You can do it, and it’s very simple.

If you want to produce a more vintage look or vintage wash on the front or back of your jeans, you can use a cheese grater to rough it up a little.

You may then take it a step further after you’ve graded it down and given it a more vintage vibe.

Grab your tweezers and begin picking at the individual threads in your jeans to make a strategic hole.

You’re going to do the same thing with your jean’s hemline.

If you want a more frayed hemline, use your tweezers to chip away at the threads at the bottom of your jeans and make your own frayed hem.

Let’s imagine you have a beautiful pair of jeans and want to make them look a little more edgy, modern, and current. Start distressing them.

That’s a simple method to do it, or you can make them appear bespoke and old. To make them appear as if they were a unique pair of jeans.

They’ll look fantastic if you DIY distress them. Just be careful not to overdo it.

Step Hem

You can make your own step hem as well. That’s one of those hemlines that’s been really popular in recent years.

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It’s very simple to accomplish.

I’ve done it before, and all you have to do is cut the hemline of your jean right across.

Then you’ll take the front of the jean, measure about a half-inch to an inch at most, cut up about a half-inch to an inch, turn it over, and cut it back down.

So all you’re doing is making a small rectangle on the front of the hemline of the jeans.

And there you have it, your very own step hem, for which you paid no money. And it only took you five minutes to do it. Isn’t that incredible?

Cuffing

How to cuff your jeans is the third jean hack you should know about.

Because you wear a wide range of footwear. You’re wearing ankle-strapped strappy sandals. You’re dressed in booties and tall boots.

You need jeans that will function with all of your numerous types of shoes, all of which are different heights, without requiring you to adjust your jeans. Who wants to be the one to do it?

Cuffing your jean is one of the greatest things you can do.

There are also various cuffs.

You may make a sailor cuff, which is a large, lengthy cuff. That one is really popular, and many celebrities use it.

You might do a single little cuff, such as cuffing it up an inch or two inches.

Then you may perform a double cuff by cuffing it up an inch or two, and then cuffing it again.

Waistline Expansion

The fourth suggestion is to use a hair tie to widen your waist.

Maybe you’re expecting a child and don’t want to buy new jeans. You don’t want to spend money on maternity jeans.

Simply loop the hair tie around the button, then loop it through the buttonhole, and then loop it back around the button.

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You’ve enlarged your waistband and kept it simple.

Simply pull your jacket, shirt, blouse, or top over the button so that no one notices you haven’t buttoned your jeans.

Stretching Jeans

Another thing you can do to expand that waistband a little bit, especially if you’ve gained a few pounds or are bloated, is to wash your jeans in cold water and hang them on a pants hanger instead of drying them (which you should never do).

Take the two clips and stretch them. Allow it to hang for an overnight period, and your waistband will stretch just enough for you to button it.

Jeans Too Big

What if you were dealing with the polar opposite issue? What if your hips are bigger than usual and your jean waistband is too big? It’s just gaping at the back.

What are you going to do about it?

For that, I’ve seen a lot of tutorials on DIY sewing, which is a little too complicated.

Taking a string is a very simple and quick workaround for this. Take a dark string that matches the color of your jeans if possible.

After that, you tie the thread by looping it through three of the loops in the rear of your jeans. So you’re squeezing it tighter in the rear.

Pull your top, blouse, or sweater down over the top of your jeans so that no one can see the string in the back.

But this is a quick and easy way to close that gaping waistline.

Test Fit Around Neck

The next tip is to test the fit of your jeans by wrapping the waistband over your neck.

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It’s worth a shot; it actually works!

Keep Zipper Up

If your zipper won’t stay up and keeps sliding down, and you’ve tried everything to make it stay, it just won’t stay. It’s quite inconvenient.

You can use a hair tie or a small key ring to remedy this by looping the hair tie through the hole on the zipper and then looping it around your belt.

Use one of those small key rings in the same way you’d use a hair tie, looping it through the hole and then looping it around your belt.

So you should be able to keep your zipper up and hidden with either of those techniques.

Preserve Color

The following jean hack is to keep your jeans’ color.

There are a few options for doing so.

To keep the die from bleeding, put a tablespoon of salt in the washing machine when you’re washing those jeans.

The second option is to turn your jeans inside out, wash them on cold, and then add a quarter cup of white vinegar to your washing machine’s detergent dispenser.

That quarter cup of vinegar should help to harden the dye, prevent bleeding, and keep the color.

Keep Fresh

Last but not least, if you’re in a rush and want to preserve your jeans looking and smelling new, don’t wash them.

They will smell and look fresh the next day if you place them in a large ziploc bag and store them in the freezer.

It won’t remove the stains or the food you spilled on them, but it will give them a fresh scent and appearance.

jeans too big hack

Author

  • Gloria is a top-performing fashion designer with more than eight years of experience in developing fashion concepts.

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